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Blog Entry Simiran Lalvani - Workers’ fictive kinship relations in Mumbai app-based food delivery
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Aug 16, 2019 last modified Aug 16, 2019 12:47 PM — filed under: , , ,
Working in the gig-economy has been associated with economic vulnerabilities. However, there are also moral and affective vulnerabilities as workers find their worth measured everyday by their performance of—and at—work and in every interaction and movement. This essay by Simiran Lalvani is the first among a series of writings by research fellows associated with the 'Mapping Digital Labour in India' project at the CIS, supported by research assistance from Azim Premji University, being published on the Platypus blog of the Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Computing (CASTAC). The essay is edited by Noopur Raval, who is co-leading the project concerned.
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Blog Entry Rethinking Conditions of Access
by Sneha PP published Oct 15, 2014 last modified Nov 13, 2015 05:35 AM — filed under: , , , ,
P. P. Sneha explores the possibilities of redefining the idea of access through the channels of education and learning.
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Blog Entry Making in the Humanities – Some Questions and Conflicts
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published May 22, 2015 last modified Nov 13, 2015 05:46 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
The following is an abstract for a proposed chapter on 'making' in the humanities, which has been accepted for publication in a volume titled 'Making Humanities Matter'. This is part of a new book series titled 'Debates in the Digital Humanities 2015' to be published by University of Minnesota Press (http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/cfps/cfp_2015_mhm). The first draft of the chapter will be shared by mid-August 2015.
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Blog Entry Mathematisation of the Urban and not Urbanisation of Mathematics: Smart Cities and the Primitive Accumulation of Data - Accepted Abstract
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published May 25, 2015 last modified Nov 13, 2015 05:47 AM — filed under: , , , ,
"Many accounts of smart cities recognise the historical coincidence of cybernetic control and neoliberal capital. Even where it is machines which process the vast amounts of data produced by the city so much so that the ruling and managerial classes disappear from view, it is usually the logic of capital that steers the flows of data, people and things. Yet what other futures of the city may be possible within the smart city, what collective intelligence may it bring forth?" The Fibreculture Journal has accepted an abstract of mine for its upcoming issue on 'Computing the City.'
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Blog Entry Studying the Emerging Database State in India: Notes for Critical Data Studies (Accepted Abstract)
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Aug 02, 2015 last modified Nov 13, 2015 05:54 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
"Critical Data Studies (CDS) is a growing field of research that focuses on the unique theoretical, ethical, and epistemological challenges posed by 'Big Data.' Rather than treat Big Data as a scientifically empirical, and therefore largely neutral phenomena, CDS advocates the view that data should be seen as always-already constituted within wider data assemblages." The Big Data and Society journal has provisionally accepted a paper abstract of mine for its upcoming special issue on Critical Data Studies.
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Blog Entry New Modes and Sites of Humanities Practice
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published May 19, 2016 last modified Jun 30, 2016 04:45 AM — filed under: , , , ,
An extended survey of digital initiatives in arts and humanities practices in India was undertaken during the last year. Provocatively called 'mapping digital humanities in India', this enquiry began with the term 'digital humanities' itself, as a 'found' name for which one needs to excavate some meaning, context, and location in India at the present moment. Instead of importing this term to describe practices taking place in this country - especially when the term itself is relatively unstable and undefined even in the Anglo-American context - what I chose to do was to take a few steps back, and outline a few questions/conflicts that the digital practitioners in arts and humanities disciplines are grappling with. The final report of this study will be published serially. This is the sixth among seven sections.
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Blog Entry RBI Consultation Paper on P2P Lending: Legality and Implications
by Pavishka Mittal published May 23, 2016 last modified May 31, 2016 01:25 PM — filed under: , , , , ,
The Reserve Bank of India published a Consultation Paper on Peer-to-Peer Lending on April 28, 2016. The Paper proposes to bring the P2P lending platforms under the purview of RBI’s regulation by defining P2P platforms as NBFCs under section 45I(f)(iii) of the RBI Act. Once notified as NBFCs, RBI can issue regulations under sections 45JA and 45L. The last date for submission of comments to the Consultation Paper is May 31, 2016. In this post, Pavishka Mittal discusses the legality and implications of the proposed classification of Peer-to-Peer lending companies as NBFCs.
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Blog Entry RBI Consultation Paper on P2P Lending: Data Security and Privacy Concerns
by Vipul Kharbanda published May 31, 2016 last modified Jun 01, 2016 11:41 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
On April 28, 2016 the Reserve Bank of India published a consultation paper on P2P Lending and invited comments from the public on the same. The Paper discusses what P2P lending is, the various regulatory practices that govern P2P lending in different jurisdictions and lists our arguments for and against regulating P2P lending platforms.
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Blog Entry Comments on the RBI's Consultation Paper on Peer to Peer Lending
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Jun 01, 2016 last modified Jun 01, 2016 08:21 PM — filed under: , , , , , ,
The Reserve Bank of India published a Consultation Paper on Peer to Peer Lending on April 28, 2016, and invited comments from the public. CIS submitted the following response, authored by Elonnai Hickok, Pavishka Mittal, Sumandro Chattapadhyay, Vidushi Marda, and Vipul Kharbanda.
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Blog Entry Digital Humanities in India – Concluding Thoughts
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Jun 30, 2016 last modified Jun 30, 2016 04:48 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
An extended survey of digital initiatives in arts and humanities practices in India was undertaken during the last year. Provocatively called 'mapping digital humanities in India', this enquiry began with the term 'digital humanities' itself, as a 'found' name for which one needs to excavate some meaning, context, and location in India at the present moment. Instead of importing this term to describe practices taking place in this country - especially when the term itself is relatively unstable and undefined even in the Anglo-American context - what I chose to do was to take a few steps back, and outline a few questions/conflicts that the digital practitioners in arts and humanities disciplines are grappling with. The final report of this study will be published serially. This is the final section.
Located in RAW