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May 2012 Bulletin
by Prasad Krishna published Jul 07, 2012 — filed under: , , , , , ,
Welcome to the newsletter issue of May 2012! In the current issue, we bring to you updates of our latest research, event reports, videos, and media coverage:
Located in About Us / Newsletters
Blog Entry Big Data and Reproductive Health in India: A Case Study of the Mother and Child Tracking System
by Ambika Tandon published Oct 17, 2019 last modified Dec 06, 2019 04:57 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
In this case study undertaken as part of the Big Data for Development (BD4D) network, Ambika Tandon evaluates the Mother and Child Tracking System (MCTS) as data-driven initiative in reproductive health at the national level in India. The study also assesses the potential of MCTS to contribute towards the big data landscape on reproductive health in the country, as the Indian state’s imagination of health informatics moves towards big data.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry The Mother and Child Tracking System - understanding data trail in the Indian healthcare systems
by Ambika Tandon published Oct 18, 2019 last modified Dec 30, 2019 05:18 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , ,
Reproductive health programmes in India have been digitising extensive data about pregnant women for over a decade, as part of multiple health information systems. These can be seen as precursors to current conceptions of big data systems within health informatics. In this article, published by Privacy International, Ambika Tandon presents some findings from a recently concluded case study of the MCTS as an example of public data-driven initiatives in reproductive health in India.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Blog Entry Decolonizing the Internet’s Languages 2019 - From Conversations to Actions
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Oct 21, 2019 last modified Nov 01, 2019 05:53 PM — filed under: , , , ,
Whose Knowledge? is organising the Decolonizing the Internet's Languages 2019 gathering in London on October 23-24 — with a specific focus on building an agenda for action to decolonize the internet’s languages. Puthiya Purayil Sneha is participating in this meeting with scholars, linguists, archivists, technologists and community activists, to share the initial findings towards the State of the Internet’s Language Report (to be published in 2020) being developed by Whose Knowledge?, Oxford Internet Institute, and the CIS.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Call for Contributions and Reflections: Your experiences in Decolonizing the Internet’s Languages!
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Aug 07, 2019 last modified Aug 07, 2019 12:29 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , ,
Whose Knowledge?, the Oxford Internet Institute, and the Centre for Internet and Society are creating a State of the Internet’s Languages report, as baseline research with both numbers and stories, to demonstrate how far we are from making the internet multilingual. We also hope to offer some possibilities for doing more to create the multilingual internet we want. This research needs the experiences and expertise of people who think about these issues of language online from different perspectives. Read the Call here and share your submission by September 2, 2019.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry State of the Internet's Languages 2020: Announcing selected contributions!
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Nov 01, 2019 last modified Nov 01, 2019 06:12 PM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
In response to our call for contributions and reflections on ‘Decolonising the Internet’s Languages’ in August, we are delighted to announce that we received 50 submissions, in over 38 languages! We are so overwhelmed and grateful for the interest and support of our many communities around the world; it demonstrates how critical this effort is for all of us. From all these extraordinary offerings, we have selected nine that we will invite and support the contributors to expand further.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Media Infrastructures and Digital Practices: Case Studies from the North East of India (Paper Presentation)
by Khetrimayum Monish Singh published Feb 05, 2019 last modified Feb 05, 2019 11:11 AM — filed under: , , , ,
Khetrimayum Monish Singh and Rajiv K. Mishra (Doctoral student, Centre for Studies in Science Policy, JNU) are presenting a co-authored paper at the Young Scholars International Conference on “Margins and Connections,” organised by the Special Centre for the Study of North East India, Jawaharlal Nehru University, on February 7-8, 2019. The conference will be held at the Committee Room of School of Social Sciences – I in JNU. Below are the conference schedule and abstract of the paper to be presented.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Locating the Mobile: An Ethnographic Investigation into Locative Media in Melbourne, Bangalore and Shanghai
by Larissa Hjorth and Genevieve Bell published Mar 23, 2012 last modified Oct 24, 2015 01:41 PM — filed under: , ,
From Google maps, geoweb, GPS (Global Positioning System), geotagging, Foursquare and Jie Pang, locative media is becoming an integral part of the smartphone (and shanzhai or copy) phenomenon. For a growing generation of users, locative media is already an everyday practice.
Located in RAW / / Blogs / Locating the Mobile
Blog Entry Infrastructure as Digital Politics: Media Practices and the Assam NRC Citizen Identification Project (Draft Paper)
by Khetrimayum Monish Singh published May 15, 2018 last modified May 15, 2018 03:35 PM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
The National Register of Citizens (NRC) exercise in Assam focuses on updating the list of Indian citizens in the state. A highly sensitive, controversial and massive exercise, the government has had several strategies to manage this project. One of the ways has been in which the government has engaged with and positioned itself, vis-a-vis the media, specifically through Facebook and Twitter, and on its own official website. This paper by Khetrimayum Monish Singh and Nazifa Ahmed is a discourse analysis of media content and user opinions on Facebook, and media responses on the NRC official website. These reflect bureaucratic practices of efficiency, transparency, trust and anxiety management; user feedback, confusion, political concerns and opinions help in accounting for and navigating through the system, and contribute to building up the NRC as an information infrastructure. We focus on how these two processes through media practices co-produce 'the sociotechnical building and maintenance' (Star and Bowker, 1999; Star and Ruhleder, 1996) of the NRC as an information infrastructure.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Not a Goodbye; More a ‘Come Again’: Thoughts on being Research Director at a moment of transition
by Nishant Shah published Jun 15, 2014 — filed under: , , ,
As I slowly make the news of my transition from being the Research Director at the Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore, to taking up a professorship at the Leuphana University, Lueneburg, Germany, there is a question that I am often asked: “Are you going to start a new research centre?” And the answer, for the most part, is “No.”
Located in RAW