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Blog Entry Studying Internet in India (2016): Selected Abstracts
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Jul 05, 2016 last modified Jul 06, 2016 06:24 AM — filed under: , , ,
We received some great submissions and decided to select twelve abstracts, and not only ten as we planned earlier. Here are the abstracts.
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Blog Entry Studying Internet in India: Selected Abstracts
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published May 10, 2015 last modified Aug 28, 2015 06:53 AM — filed under: , , ,
We received thirty five engaging abstracts in response to the call for essays on 'Studying Internet in India.' Here are the ten selected abstracts. The final essays will be published from June onwards.
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Blog Entry Studying the Internet Discourse in India through the Prism of Human Rights
by Deva Prasad M published Jul 22, 2015 — filed under: , , , ,
This post by Deva Prasad M is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Deva Prasad is Assistant Professor at the National Law School of India University (NLSIU), Bangalore. In this essay, he analyses key public discussions around Internet related issues from the human rights angle, and explores how this angle may contribute to understanding the features of the Internet discourse in India.
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Blog Entry Tech Anthropology Today: Collaborate, Rather than Fetishize from Afar
by Geert Lovink and Ramesh Srinivasan published May 16, 2017 last modified May 16, 2017 02:51 PM — filed under: , , , ,
"That is why the 'offline' if you will is so critical to understanding the 'online'—because they do not exist in isolation and what we have constructed is an illusory binary between the two." In this interview, Geert Lovink discusses with Ramesh Srinivasan: “how can we embrace the realities of communities too-often relegated to the margins?”
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Blog Entry The Curious Incidents on Matrimonial Websites in India
by Abhimanyu Roy published Aug 30, 2016 last modified Aug 30, 2016 10:52 AM — filed under: , ,
This essay by Abhimanyu Roy is part of the 'Studying Internet in India' series. The author explores how the curious interplays between the arranged marriage market in India the rise of matrimonial sites such as Jeevansathi.com and Shaadi.com. The gravity of the impact that such web-based services have on the lives of users is substantially greater than most other everyday web-enabled transactions, such as an Uber ride or a Foodpanda order. From outright fraud to online harassment, newspaper back pages are filled with nightmare stories that begin on a matrimonial website. So much so that the Indian government has set up a panel to regulate matrimonial sites. The essay analyses the role of matrimonial websites in modern day India, and the challenges this awkward amalgamation of the internet and love gives rise to.
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Blog Entry The Digital Humanities from Father Busa to Edward Snowden
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Sep 04, 2017 last modified Oct 04, 2017 11:02 AM — filed under: , ,
What do Edward Snowden, the whistle-blower behind the NSA surveillance revelations, and Father Roberto Busa, an Italian Jesuit, who worked for almost his entire life on Saint Thomas Aquinas, have in common? The simple answer would be: the computer. Things however are a bit more complex than that, and the reason for choosing these two people to explain what the Digital Humanities are, is that in some sense they represent the origins and the present consequences of a certain way of thinking about computers. This essay by Dr. Domenico Fiormonte, lecturer in the Sociology of Communication and Culture in the Department of Political Sciences at University Roma Tre, was originally published in the Media Development journal.
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Blog Entry The Internet in the Indian Judicial Imagination
by Divij Joshi published Sep 09, 2015 — filed under: , , , ,
This post by Divij Joshi is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Divij is a final year student at the National Law School of India University, Bangalore and is a keen observer and researcher on issues of law, policy and technology. In this essay, he traces the history of the Internet in India through the lens of judicial trends, and looks at how the judiciary has defined its own role in relation to the Internet.
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Blog Entry The Many Lives and Sites of Internet in Bhubaneswar
by Sailen Routray published Sep 21, 2015 — filed under: , , ,
This post by Sailen Routray is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Sailen is a researcher, writer, editor and translator who lives and works in Bhubaneswar. In this essay, he takes a preliminary step towards capturing some of the experiences of running and using internet cafes, experiences that lie at the interstices of (digital) objects and spaces, that are at the same time a history of the internet as well as a personal history of the city.
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Blog Entry Users and the Internet
by Purbasha Auddy published Jul 10, 2015 last modified Jul 10, 2015 04:20 AM — filed under: , ,
This post by Purbasha Auddy is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Purbasha is a SYLFF PhD fellow at the School of Cultural Texts and Records (SCTR), Jadavpur University, with more than eight years of work experience in digital archiving. She has also been teaching for the last two years in the newly-started post-graduate diploma course in Digital Humanities and Cultural Informatics offered by the SCTR. In this essay, Purbasha explores the constructions of the ideas of the Indian Internet users through the advertisements that talk about data packages, mobile phones or apps.
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Blog Entry War Driving in Lhasa Vegas
by Oxblood Ruffin published Aug 17, 2015 last modified Aug 17, 2015 08:19 AM — filed under: ,
This post by Oxblood Ruffin is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Oxblood Ruffin is a hacktivist and film maker. He joined the CULT OF THE DEAD COW in 1996 as its Foreign Minister. Colonel Ruffin is co-author of the Hacktivismo Enhanced Source Software Licencse Agreement (HESSLA), network curmudgeon, and line cook. He will publish a book on information warfare in 2016. In this essay, Colonel Ruffin traces the history of Internet access in Dharamsala, and the factors at play in shaping it - mundane and maverick, familiar and outlier.
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