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Blog Entry Do I Want to Say Happy B’day?
by Nishant Shah published Aug 07, 2016 last modified Aug 22, 2016 09:53 AM — filed under: , , ,
When it comes to greeting friends on their birthdays, social media prompts are a great reminder. So why does an online message leave us cold?
Located in RAW
Blog Entry 101 Ways of Starting an ISP:* No. 53 - Conversation, Content and Weird Fiction
by Surfatial published Aug 03, 2016 — filed under: , , ,
This essay by Surfatial is part of the 'Studying Internet in India' series. It argues that the internet has created a space for philosophical questioning among contemporary Indian participants which can develop further, despite common assertions that online spaces are largely uncivil and abusive. It actively explores how anonymous and pseudonymous content production may offer a method for exploring and expressing the internet in India, with a certain degree of freedom, and how spam-like methods may prove effective in puncturing filter bubbles.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Studying Internet in India (2016): Selected Abstracts
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Jul 05, 2016 last modified Jul 06, 2016 06:24 AM — filed under: , , ,
We received some great submissions and decided to select twelve abstracts, and not only ten as we planned earlier. Here are the abstracts.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Call for Essays: Studying Internet in India
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published May 20, 2016 last modified Jul 04, 2016 12:48 PM — filed under: , , , ,
As Internet makes itself comfortable amidst everyday lives in India, it becomes everywhere and everyware, it comes in 40 MBPS Unlimited and in chhota recharges – though no longer in zero flavour – the Researchers at Work (RAW) programme at the Centre for Internet and Society invites abstracts for essays that explore how do we study internet in India today.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry The Many Lives and Sites of Internet in Bhubaneswar
by Sailen Routray published Sep 21, 2015 — filed under: , , ,
This post by Sailen Routray is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Sailen is a researcher, writer, editor and translator who lives and works in Bhubaneswar. In this essay, he takes a preliminary step towards capturing some of the experiences of running and using internet cafes, experiences that lie at the interstices of (digital) objects and spaces, that are at the same time a history of the internet as well as a personal history of the city.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry The Internet in the Indian Judicial Imagination
by Divij Joshi published Sep 09, 2015 — filed under: , , , ,
This post by Divij Joshi is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Divij is a final year student at the National Law School of India University, Bangalore and is a keen observer and researcher on issues of law, policy and technology. In this essay, he traces the history of the Internet in India through the lens of judicial trends, and looks at how the judiciary has defined its own role in relation to the Internet.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Governing Speech on the Internet: From the Free Marketplace Policy to a Controlled 'Public Sphere'
by Smarika Kumar published Aug 28, 2015 last modified Aug 28, 2015 05:57 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This post by Smarika Kumar is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Smarika is a consultant with Alternative Law Forum, Bangalore. She is interested in issues concerning law and technology. In this essay, Smarika explores how through the use of policy and regulation, the private marketplace of the internet is sought to be reined in and reconciled to the public sphere, which is mostly represented through legislations governing the internet.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry War Driving in Lhasa Vegas
by Oxblood Ruffin published Aug 17, 2015 last modified Aug 17, 2015 08:19 AM — filed under: ,
This post by Oxblood Ruffin is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Oxblood Ruffin is a hacktivist and film maker. He joined the CULT OF THE DEAD COW in 1996 as its Foreign Minister. Colonel Ruffin is co-author of the Hacktivismo Enhanced Source Software Licencse Agreement (HESSLA), network curmudgeon, and line cook. He will publish a book on information warfare in 2016. In this essay, Colonel Ruffin traces the history of Internet access in Dharamsala, and the factors at play in shaping it - mundane and maverick, familiar and outlier.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Mock-Calling – Ironies of Outsourcing and the Aspirations of an Individual
by Sreedeep published Aug 06, 2015 last modified Aug 06, 2015 05:00 AM — filed under: , , ,
This post by Sreedeep is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. He is an independent photographer and a Fellow at the Centre for Public Affairs and Critical Theory, Shiv Nadar University, Delhi. In this essay, Sreedeep explores the anxieties and ironies of the unprecedented IT/BPO boom in India through the perspective and experiences of a new entrant in the industry, a decade ago. The narrative tries to capture some of the radical hedonistic consequences of the IT-burst on our lifestyles, imagination and aspirations delineated and fraught with layers of conscious deception and prolonged probation.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry 'Originality,' 'Authenticity,' and 'Experimentation': Understanding Tagore’s Music on YouTube
by Ipsita Sengupta published Jul 27, 2015 last modified Jul 07, 2016 02:18 AM — filed under: , ,
This post by Ipsita Sengupta is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. In this essay, she explores the responses to various renditions of songs composed by Rabindranath Tagore available on YouTube and the questions they raise regarding online listening cultures and ideas of authorship of music.
Located in RAW