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Blog Entry How India Makes E-books Easier to Ban than Books (And How We Can Change That)
by Pranesh Prakash published Jan 24, 2012 last modified Feb 21, 2012 11:50 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
Without getting into questions of what should and should not be unlawful speech, Pranesh Prakash chooses to take a look at how Indian law promotes arbitrary removal and blocking of websites, website content, and online services, and how it makes it much easier than getting offline printed speech removed.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Blog Entry Universal Service for Persons with Disabilities: A Global Survey of Policy Interventions and Good Practices
by Nirmita Narasimhan published Dec 27, 2011 last modified Oct 08, 2012 05:43 AM — filed under: , ,
The Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies and the Centre for Internet and Societies in cooperation with the Hans Foundation have published the Universal Service for Persons with Disabilities: A Global Survey of Policy Interventions and Good Practices. The book consists of a Foreword by Axel Leblois, an Introduction and four chapters. Deepti Bharthur, Axel Leblois and Nirmita Narasimhan have contributed to the chapters.
Blog Entry The Digital Classroom: Social Justice and Pedagogy
by Nishant Shah published Dec 23, 2011 last modified May 08, 2015 12:36 PM — filed under: , , , , , ,
What happens when we look at the classroom as a space of social justice? What are the ways in which students can be engaged in learning beyond rote memorisation? What innovative methods can be evolved to make students stakeholders in their learning process? These were some of the questions that were thrown up and discussed at the 2 day Faculty Training workshop for participant from colleges included in the Pathways to Higher Education programme, supported by Ford Foundation and collaboratively executed by the Higher Education Innovation and Research Application and the Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore.
Located in Digital Natives / Pathways to Higher Education
Blog Entry Invisible Censorship: How the Government Censors Without Being Seen
by Pranesh Prakash published Dec 14, 2011 last modified Jan 04, 2012 08:59 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
The Indian government wants to censor the Internet without being seen to be censoring the Internet. This article by Pranesh Prakash shows how the government has been able to achieve this through the Information Technology Act and the Intermediary Guidelines Rules it passed in April 2011. It now wants methods of censorship that leave even fewer traces, which is why Mr. Kapil Sibal, Union Minister for Communications and Information Technology talks of Internet 'self-regulation', and has brought about an amendment of the Copyright Act that requires instant removal of content.
Located in Internet Governance
Blog Entry Online Pre-Censorship is Harmful and Impractical
by Pranesh Prakash published Dec 07, 2011 last modified Dec 12, 2011 05:00 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , ,
The Union Minister for Communications and Information Technology, Mr. Kapil Sibal wants Internet intermediaries to pre-censor content uploaded by their users. Pranesh Prakash takes issue with this and explains why this is a problem, even if the government's heart is in the right place. Further, he points out that now is the time to take action on the draconian IT Rules which are before the Parliament.
Located in Internet Governance
Blog Entry Technology, Social Justice and Higher Education
by Prasad Krishna published Dec 07, 2011 last modified Mar 30, 2015 02:54 PM — filed under: , , ,
Since the last two years, we at the Centre for Internet and Society, have been working with the Higher Education Innovation and Research Applications at the Centre for the Study of Culture and Society, on a project called Pathways to Higher Education, supported by the Ford Foundation.
Located in Digital Natives / Pathways to Higher Education / Blog
Blog Entry Know your Users, Match their Needs!
by Rebecca Schild published Nov 23, 2011 last modified Feb 27, 2012 03:06 PM — filed under: , , , ,
As Free Access to Law initiatives in the Global South enter into a new stage of maturity, they must be certain not to lose sight of their users’ needs. The following post gives a summary of the “Good Practices Handbook”, a research output of the collaborative project Free Access to Law — Is it Here to Stay? undertaken by LexUM (Canada) and the South African Legal Institute in partnership with the Centre for Internet and Society.
Located in Openness / Blog
Blog Entry e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities (Russian Version)
by Prasad Krishna published Nov 04, 2011 last modified Apr 26, 2012 10:04 AM — filed under: , , ,
The e-Accessibility Policy Handbook for Persons with Disabilities is based upon the online ITU-G3ict e-Accessibility Policy Toolkit for Persons with Disabilities (www.e-accessibilitytoolkit.org) which was released in February 2010. This is the Russian translation of the same.
Located in Accessibility
Blog Entry Analysis of DIT's Response to Second RTI on Website Blocking
by Pranesh Prakash published Oct 27, 2011 last modified Dec 02, 2011 09:26 AM — filed under: , ,
In this blog post, Pranesh Prakash briefly analyses the DIT's response to an RTI request on website blocking alongside the most recent edition of Google's Transparency Report, and what it tells us about the online censorship regime in India.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Blog Entry Digital AlterNatives with a Cause?
by Nishant Shah published Sep 15, 2011 last modified Apr 10, 2015 09:22 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Hivos and the Centre for Internet and Society have consolidated their three year knowledge inquiry into the field of youth, technology and change in a four book collective “Digital AlterNatives with a cause?”. This collaboratively produced collective, edited by Nishant Shah and Fieke Jansen, asks critical and pertinent questions about theory and practice around 'digital revolutions' in a post MENA (Middle East - North Africa) world. It works with multiple vocabularies and frameworks and produces dialogues and conversations between digital natives, academic and research scholars, practitioners, development agencies and corporate structures to examine the nature and practice of digital natives in emerging contexts from the Global South.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog