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Blog Entry Between Platform and Pandemic: Migrants in India's Gig Economy
by Kaarika Das and Srravya C published Dec 06, 2021 — filed under: , , , , ,
In response to the rising number of COVID-19 cases in India, the central government announced a nationwide lockdown in March 2020.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Between the Stirrup and the Ground: Relocating Digital Activism
by Nishant Shah published Aug 23, 2011 last modified Oct 25, 2015 05:58 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
In this peer reviewed research paper, Nishant Shah and Fieke Jansen draws on a research project that focuses on understanding new technology, mediated identities, and their relationship with processes of change in their immediate and extended environments in emerging information societies in the global south. It suggests that endemic to understanding digital activism is the need to look at the recalibrated relationships between the state and the citizens through the prism of technology and agency. The paper was published in Democracy & Society, a publication of the Center for Democracy and Civil Society, Volume 8, Issue 2, Summer 2011.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Between the Stirrup and the Ground: Relocating Digital Activism
by Nishant Shah published Aug 23, 2011 last modified May 14, 2015 12:14 PM — filed under: , , ,
In this peer reviewed research paper, Nishant Shah and Fieke Jansen draws on a research project that focuses on understanding new technology, mediated identities, and their relationship with processes of change in their immediate and extended environments in emerging information societies in the global south. It suggests that endemic to understanding digital activism is the need to look at the recalibrated relationships between the state and the citizens through the prism of technology and agency. The paper was published in Democracy & Society, a publication of the Center for Democracy and Civil Society, Volume 8, Issue 2, Summer 2011.
Located in Digital Natives
Blog Entry Big Data and Reproductive Health in India: A Case Study of the Mother and Child Tracking System
by Ambika Tandon published Oct 17, 2019 last modified Dec 06, 2019 04:57 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
In this case study undertaken as part of the Big Data for Development (BD4D) network, Ambika Tandon evaluates the Mother and Child Tracking System (MCTS) as data-driven initiative in reproductive health at the national level in India. The study also assesses the potential of MCTS to contribute towards the big data landscape on reproductive health in the country, as the Indian state’s imagination of health informatics moves towards big data.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Blinkit protests: For gig workers, there is no income security – and little legal recourse
by Aditi Surie and Ambika Tandon published Dec 31, 2020 last modified Jul 04, 2023 07:30 AM — filed under: ,
Aditi Surie and Ambika Tandon co-authored an opinion essay on the reasons behind a week-long strike by workers of Blinkit — a popular hyperlocal delivery platform. The protests were in response to changes in Blinkit’s policies that will halve workers’ pay.
Located in RAW
File Book 1: To Be, Digital AlterNatives with a Cause?
by Nishant Shah last modified May 15, 2015 12:08 PM — filed under: , , ,
In this first book of the Digital AlterNatives with a Cause? Collection, we concentrate on what it means to be a Digital Native. Within popular scholarship and discourse, it is presumed that digital natives are born digital. Ranging from Mark Prensky’s original conception of the identity which marked all people born after 1980 as Digital Natives to John Palfrey and Urs Gasser’s more nuanced understanding of specific young people in certain parts of the world as ‘Born Digital’, there remains a presumption that the young peoples’ relationship with technology is automatic and natural. In particular, the idea of being ‘born digital’ signifies that there are people who, at a visceral, unlearned level, respond to digital technologies. This idea of being born digital hides the complex mechanics of infrastructure, access, affordability, learning, education, language, gender, etc. that play a significant role in determining who gets to become a digital native and how s/he achieves it. In this book, we explore what it means to be a digital native in emerging information societies. The different contributions in this book posit what it means to be a digital native in different parts of the world. However, none of the contribution accepts the name ‘Digital Native’ as a given. Instead, the different authors demonstrate how there can be no one singular definition of a Digital Native. In fact, they show how, contextualised, historical, socially embedded, politically nuanced understanding of people’s interaction with technology provide a better insight into how one becomes a digital native.
Located in Digital Natives
Blog Entry Bridging the Information Divide - Political Quotient
by Denisse Albornoz published Apr 14, 2014 last modified Oct 24, 2015 02:28 PM — filed under: , , ,
On this post, we will unpack 'information poverty'- a problem lying at the very foundation of the crises that inspired this project and a barrier impacting political action. We interview Surabhi HR, the founder director of the political consulting firm Political Quotient, an initiative that seeks to change how youth interacts with politics in India
Located in Digital Natives / Making Change
Blog Entry Brindaalakshmi.K - Gendering of Development Data in India: Beyond the Binary
by Brindaalakshmi.K published Jun 30, 2020 last modified Jun 30, 2020 10:26 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This report by Brindaalakshmi.K seeks to understand the gendering of development data in India: collection of data and issuance of government (foundational and functional) identity documents to persons identifying outside the cis/binary genders of female and male, and the data misrepresentations, barriers to accessing public and private services, and informational exclusions that still remain. Sumandro Chattapadhyay edited the report and Puthiya Purayil Sneha offered additional editorial support. This work was undertaken as part of the Big Data for Development network supported by International Development Research Centre (IDRC), Canada.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Buying into the Aakash Dream - A Tablet’s Tale of Mass Education
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Apr 25, 2016 — filed under: , , , ,
The low-cost Aakash tablet and its previous iterations in India have gone through several phases of technological changes and ideological experiments. Did the government prioritise familiarity and literacy about personal technological devices over the promise of quality mass education generated by low-cost devices? This article by Sumandro Chattapadhyay and Jahnavi Phalkey (India Institute, King's College London) was published by EPW in the Web Exclusive section. Here is the unabridged version of the article.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Call for Applications: 'Maps for Making Change' - Using Geographical Mapping Techniques to Support Struggles for Social Justice in India
by Anja Kovacs published Oct 30, 2009 last modified Oct 05, 2015 03:04 PM — filed under: , , , ,
Deadline: 20 November 2009. Maps for Making Change is a two-month project specifically designed for activists and supporters of social movements and campaigns in India. It provides participants with an exciting opportunity to explore how a range of digital mapping techniques can be used to support struggles for social justice. It also allows you to immediately develop and implement in practice a concrete mapping project relevant to your campaign or movement, with full technical support. Interested in joining us? Send in your application by 20 November 2009.
Located in Advocacy / Other Advocacy