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Blog Entry Comments on the DoT Panel Report via MyGov
by Pranesh Prakash published Sep 26, 2015 — filed under: ,
On behalf of the Centre for Internet and Society, I must commend the Department of Telecom Panel on its report. Overall, it displays a far better understanding of the underlying issues than the TRAI consultation paper did, and is overall a good effort at balancing the different sides. However, some of its most important recommendations are completely off-mark and would be disastrous if accepted by the government.
Located in Telecom / Blog
Blog Entry Crowdsourcing Incidents of Communication Privacy Violation in India
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Oct 16, 2015 last modified Oct 16, 2015 10:49 AM — filed under: , ,
In the context of several ongoing threads of debates and policy discussions, we are initiating this effort to crowdsource incidents of violation of digital/online/telephonic privacy of persons and organisations in India. The full list of submitted incidents is publicly shared, under Creative Commons Attributions-ShareAlike 4.0 International license. Please contribute and share with your friends and colleagues.
Located in Internet Governance
Blog Entry An Introduction to Spectrum Sharing
by Beli published Feb 24, 2014 last modified Mar 20, 2014 09:34 AM — filed under: , ,
We will look at how current technology – mainly GSM, but also CDMA and touching upon LTE - shares spectrum, how they might share spectrum, the trade-off between spectral (in this case, 'trunking') and 'economic' efficiency in the traditional, purely intra-operator shared scenario, and how it might be overcome by inter-operator sharing.
Located in Telecom / Blog
Blog Entry Digital Futures: Internet Freedom and Millennials
by Nishant Shah published Feb 06, 2012 last modified Feb 15, 2012 04:25 AM — filed under:
Last year was a turbulent year for freedom of speech and online expression in India. Early in 2011 we saw the introduction of an Intermediaries Liability amendment to the existing Information Technologies Law in the country, which allowed intermediaries like internet service providers (ISPs), digital content platforms (like Facebook and Twitter) and other actors managing online content, to remove material that is deemed objectionable without routing it through a court of law. Effectively, this was an attempt at crowdsourcing censorship, where at the whim or fancy of any person who flags information as offensive, it could be removed from digital platforms, writes Nishant Shah in DMLcentral on 3 February 2012.
Located in Internet Governance
Blog Entry Towards Algorithmic Transparency
by Radhika Radhakrishnan, and Amber Sinha published Jul 06, 2020 last modified Jul 15, 2020 01:16 PM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This policy brief examines the issue of transparency as a key ethical component in the development, deployment, and use of Artificial Intelligence.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Blog Entry IFAT and ITF - Protecting Workers in the Digital Platform Economy: Investigating Ola and Uber Drivers’ Occupational Health and Safety
by Indian Federation of App-based Transport Workers (IFAT) and International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF), New Delhi office published Jun 25, 2021 last modified Jun 29, 2021 06:53 AM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
Between July to November 2019, Indian Federation of App-based Transport Workers (IFAT) and International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF), New Delhi office, conducted 2,128 surveys across 6 major cities: Bengaluru, Chennai, Delhi NCR, Hyderabad, Jaipur, and Lucknow, to determine the occupational health and safety of app-based transport workers. CIS is proud to publish the study report and the press release. Akash Sheshadri, Ambika Tandon, and Aayush Rathi of CIS supported post-production of this report.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry IFAT and ITF - Locking Down the Impact of Covid-19
by Indian Federation of App-based Transport Workers (IFAT) and International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF), New Delhi office published Sep 17, 2020 last modified Jun 29, 2021 07:27 AM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
This report, by Indian Federation of App-based Transport Workers (IFAT) and International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF), New Delhi office, explores the responses to the outbreak of Covid-19 by digital platform based companies, trade unions, and governments to help out workers for digital platform based companies hereafter app based workers during the lockdown. The research work in this article is a characterization of the struggles of app based workers during the global pandemic and how it has affected and changed the world of work for them. The surveys were conducted amongst the workforce working for app based companies like Ola, Uber, Swiggy, Zomato etc. This study is partially supported by CIS as part of the Feminist Internet Research Network led by the Association for Progressive Communications.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Economic, Social and Cultural Rights in India: Opportunities for Advocacy in Intellectual Property
by Sunil Abraham and Vidushi Marda published Apr 23, 2017 — filed under: , , ,
Centre for Internet & Society worked on a three part case study. The first case study on digital protection of traditional knowledge was published by GIS Watch in December 2016. The other two case studies along with the synthesis overview has also been published.
Located in Openness
Blog Entry Alt needs to Shift
by Nishant Shah published Nov 18, 2012 last modified Dec 14, 2012 10:03 AM — filed under: , ,
People maybe talking more online, but they all seem to be talking about the same kind of thing.
Located in RAW / Digital Humanities
Blog Entry A Question of Digital Humanities
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Nov 16, 2015 last modified Jun 30, 2016 05:06 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
An extended survey of digital initiatives in arts and humanities practices in India was undertaken during the last year. Provocatively called 'mapping digital humanities in India', this enquiry began with the term 'digital humanities' itself, as a 'found' name for which one needs to excavate some meaning, context, and location in India at the present moment. Instead of importing this term to describe practices taking place in this country - especially when the term itself is relatively unstable and undefined even in the Anglo-American context - what I chose to do was to take a few steps back, and outline a few questions/conflicts that the digital practitioners in arts and humanities disciplines are grappling with. The final report of this study will be published serially. This is the second among seven sections.
Located in RAW