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Blog Entry Digital native: Lie Me a River
by Nishant Shah published Mar 19, 2017 — filed under: , ,
The sea of social media around us often drowns the truth, exchanging misinformation for facts.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Digital Native: People Like Us
by Nishant Shah published Dec 18, 2016 — filed under: , ,
How the algorithm decides what you see on your timeline. If you have been hanging out on social media, there is one thing you can’t have escaped — a filter bubble. Be it demonetisation and its discontents, the fake news stories that seem to have ruined the US election, or the eternal conflict about the nature of Indian politics, your timeline must have been filled largely by people who think like you.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Digital Native: The Future is Now
by Nishant Shah published Oct 17, 2016 — filed under: , ,
The digital is not just an addition but the new norm in our lives, and it might not be all good. There used to be a popular joke among technology geeks when Bluetooth arrived on our mobile devices — everything becomes better with Bluetooth.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Digital native: The View from My Bubble
by Nishant Shah published Dec 05, 2016 — filed under: , , ,
In the digital world, the privileged have the power to deny a devastating crisis for the poor.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Digital native: The Voices in Our Heads
by Nishant Shah published Nov 22, 2016 — filed under: ,
What if our phones were to go silent? Would you be able to deal with the silence?
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Do I Want to Say Happy B’day?
by Nishant Shah published Aug 07, 2016 last modified Aug 22, 2016 09:53 AM — filed under: , , ,
When it comes to greeting friends on their birthdays, social media prompts are a great reminder. So why does an online message leave us cold?
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Effective Activism: The Internet, Social Media, and Hierarchical Activism in New Delhi
by Sarah McKeever published Jul 16, 2015 last modified Jul 16, 2015 08:22 AM — filed under: , , ,
This post by Sarah McKeever is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Sarah is a PhD candidate at the India Institute, King’s College London, and her work focuses on the impact of social media on contemporary political movements. In this essay, she explores the increasingly hierarchical system of activism on the Internet, based on Western corporate desire for data, and how it is shaping who is seen and heard on the Internet in India.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Essays on #List — Selected Abstracts
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Sep 03, 2019 last modified Sep 03, 2019 01:38 PM — filed under: , , , ,
In response to a recent call for essays that social, economic, cultural, political, infrastructural, or aesthetic dimensions of the #List, we received 11 abstracts. Out of these, we have selected 4 pieces to be published as part of a series titled #List on the [email protected] blog. Please find below the details of the selected abstracts. The call for essays on #List remains open, and we are accepting and assessing the incoming abstracts on a rolling basis.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Essays on 'Offline' - Selected Abstracts
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Sep 06, 2018 last modified Sep 06, 2018 02:14 PM — filed under: , , ,
In response to a recent call for essays that explore various dimensions of offline lives, we received 22 abstracts. Out of these, we have selected 10 pieces to be published as part of a series titled 'Offline' on the upcoming [email protected] blog. Please find below the details of the selected abstracts.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Governing Speech on the Internet: From the Free Marketplace Policy to a Controlled 'Public Sphere'
by Smarika Kumar published Aug 28, 2015 last modified Aug 28, 2015 05:57 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This post by Smarika Kumar is part of the 'Studying Internets in India' series. Smarika is a consultant with Alternative Law Forum, Bangalore. She is interested in issues concerning law and technology. In this essay, Smarika explores how through the use of policy and regulation, the private marketplace of the internet is sought to be reined in and reconciled to the public sphere, which is mostly represented through legislations governing the internet.
Located in RAW