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Blog Entry Between the Stirrup and the Ground: Relocating Digital Activism
by Nishant Shah published Aug 23, 2011 last modified Oct 25, 2015 05:58 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
In this peer reviewed research paper, Nishant Shah and Fieke Jansen draws on a research project that focuses on understanding new technology, mediated identities, and their relationship with processes of change in their immediate and extended environments in emerging information societies in the global south. It suggests that endemic to understanding digital activism is the need to look at the recalibrated relationships between the state and the citizens through the prism of technology and agency. The paper was published in Democracy & Society, a publication of the Center for Democracy and Civil Society, Volume 8, Issue 2, Summer 2011.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Between the Stirrup and the Ground: Relocating Digital Activism
by Nishant Shah published Aug 23, 2011 last modified May 14, 2015 12:14 PM — filed under: , , ,
In this peer reviewed research paper, Nishant Shah and Fieke Jansen draws on a research project that focuses on understanding new technology, mediated identities, and their relationship with processes of change in their immediate and extended environments in emerging information societies in the global south. It suggests that endemic to understanding digital activism is the need to look at the recalibrated relationships between the state and the citizens through the prism of technology and agency. The paper was published in Democracy & Society, a publication of the Center for Democracy and Civil Society, Volume 8, Issue 2, Summer 2011.
Located in Digital Natives
File Book 1: To Be, Digital AlterNatives with a Cause?
by Nishant Shah last modified May 15, 2015 12:08 PM — filed under: , , ,
In this first book of the Digital AlterNatives with a Cause? Collection, we concentrate on what it means to be a Digital Native. Within popular scholarship and discourse, it is presumed that digital natives are born digital. Ranging from Mark Prensky’s original conception of the identity which marked all people born after 1980 as Digital Natives to John Palfrey and Urs Gasser’s more nuanced understanding of specific young people in certain parts of the world as ‘Born Digital’, there remains a presumption that the young peoples’ relationship with technology is automatic and natural. In particular, the idea of being ‘born digital’ signifies that there are people who, at a visceral, unlearned level, respond to digital technologies. This idea of being born digital hides the complex mechanics of infrastructure, access, affordability, learning, education, language, gender, etc. that play a significant role in determining who gets to become a digital native and how s/he achieves it. In this book, we explore what it means to be a digital native in emerging information societies. The different contributions in this book posit what it means to be a digital native in different parts of the world. However, none of the contribution accepts the name ‘Digital Native’ as a given. Instead, the different authors demonstrate how there can be no one singular definition of a Digital Native. In fact, they show how, contextualised, historical, socially embedded, politically nuanced understanding of people’s interaction with technology provide a better insight into how one becomes a digital native.
Located in Digital Natives
Blog Entry Bridging the Information Divide - Political Quotient
by Denisse Albornoz published Apr 14, 2014 last modified Oct 24, 2015 02:28 PM — filed under: , , ,
On this post, we will unpack 'information poverty'- a problem lying at the very foundation of the crises that inspired this project and a barrier impacting political action. We interview Surabhi HR, the founder director of the political consulting firm Political Quotient, an initiative that seeks to change how youth interacts with politics in India
Located in Digital Natives / Making Change
Blog Entry Buying into the Aakash Dream - A Tablet’s Tale of Mass Education
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Apr 25, 2016 — filed under: , , , ,
The low-cost Aakash tablet and its previous iterations in India have gone through several phases of technological changes and ideological experiments. Did the government prioritise familiarity and literacy about personal technological devices over the promise of quality mass education generated by low-cost devices? This article by Sumandro Chattapadhyay and Jahnavi Phalkey (India Institute, King's College London) was published by EPW in the Web Exclusive section. Here is the unabridged version of the article.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Call for Applications: 'Maps for Making Change' - Using Geographical Mapping Techniques to Support Struggles for Social Justice in India
by Anja Kovacs published Oct 30, 2009 last modified Oct 05, 2015 03:04 PM — filed under: , , , ,
Deadline: 20 November 2009. Maps for Making Change is a two-month project specifically designed for activists and supporters of social movements and campaigns in India. It provides participants with an exciting opportunity to explore how a range of digital mapping techniques can be used to support struggles for social justice. It also allows you to immediately develop and implement in practice a concrete mapping project relevant to your campaign or movement, with full technical support. Interested in joining us? Send in your application by 20 November 2009.
Located in Advocacy / Other Advocacy
Blog Entry Call for Contributions and Reflections: Your experiences in Decolonizing the Internet’s Languages!
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Aug 07, 2019 last modified Aug 07, 2019 12:29 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , ,
Whose Knowledge?, the Oxford Internet Institute, and the Centre for Internet and Society are creating a State of the Internet’s Languages report, as baseline research with both numbers and stories, to demonstrate how far we are from making the internet multilingual. We also hope to offer some possibilities for doing more to create the multilingual internet we want. This research needs the experiences and expertise of people who think about these issues of language online from different perspectives. Read the Call here and share your submission by September 2, 2019.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Call for Essays — #List
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Jul 12, 2019 last modified Aug 07, 2019 10:58 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
The [email protected] programme at CIS invites abstracts for essays that explore social, economic, cultural, political, infrastructural, or aesthetic dimensions of the ‘list’. Please submit the abstracts by Friday, August 23, 2019 (extended).
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Call for Essays: Offline
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Aug 09, 2018 last modified Aug 20, 2018 06:58 AM — filed under: , , , ,
Who is offline, and is it a choice? The global project of bringing people online has spurred several commendable initiatives in expanding access to digital devices, networks, and content, and often contentious ones such as Free Basics / internet.org, which illustrate the intersectionalities of scale, privilege, and rights that we need to be mindful of when we imagine the offline. Further, the experience of the internet, for a large section of people is often mediated through prior and ongoing experiences of traditional media, and through cultural metaphors and cognitive frames that transcend more practical registers such as consumption and facilitation. How do we approach, study, and represent this disembodied internet – devoid of its hypertext, platforms, devices, it's nuts and bolts, but still tangible through engagement in myriad, personal and often indiscernible ways. The [email protected] programme invites abstracts for essays that explore dimensions of offline lives.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Call for Essays: Studying Internet in India
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Apr 06, 2015 last modified Aug 28, 2015 07:09 AM — filed under: , , , ,
As Internet makes itself comfortable amidst everyday lives in India, it becomes everywhere and everyware, it comes in 40 MBPS Unlimited and in chhota recharges – and even in zero flavour – the Researchers at Work (RAW) programme at the Centre for Internet and Society invites abstracts for essays that explore what it means to study Internet(s) in India today.
Located in RAW