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Blog Entry Whose Change is it Anyway?
by Nishant Shah published Jun 18, 2013 last modified Apr 17, 2015 10:56 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This thought piece is an attempt to reflect critically on existing practices of “making change” and its implications for the future of citizen action in information and network societies. It observes that change is constantly and explicitly invoked at different stages in research, practice, and policy in relation to digital technologies, citizen action, and network societies.
Located in Digital Natives / Blog
Blog Entry Arguments Against Software Patents in India
by Pranesh Prakash published Feb 22, 2010 last modified Mar 13, 2012 10:43 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
CIS believes that software patents are harmful for the software industry and for consumers. In this post, Pranesh Prakash looks at the philosophical, legal and practical reasons for holding such a position in India. This is a slightly modified version of a presentation made by Pranesh Prakash at the iTechLaw conference in Bangalore on February 5, 2010, as part of a panel discussing software patents in India, the United States, and the European Union.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry Technological Protection Measures in the Copyright (Amendment) Bill, 2010
by Pranesh Prakash published Apr 28, 2010 last modified May 17, 2012 04:51 PM — filed under: , , , , ,
In this post Pranesh Prakash conducts a legal exegesis of section 65A of the Copyright (Amendment) Bill, 2010, which deals with the stuff that enables 'Digital Rights/Restrictions Management', i.e., Technological Protection Measures. He notes that while the provision avoids some mistakes of the American law, it still poses grave problems to consumers, and that there are many uncertainties in it still.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry Exceptions and Limitations in Indian Copyright Law for Education: An Assessment
by Lawrence Liang published May 13, 2010 last modified Oct 20, 2011 02:08 PM — filed under: ,
This paper examines the nature of exceptions and limitations in copyright law for the purposes of the use of copyrighted materials for education. It looks at the existing national and international regime, and argues for why there is a need for greater exceptions and limitations to address the needs of developing countries. The paper contextualizes the debate by looking at the high costs of learning materials and the impediment caused to e-learning and distance education by strong copyright regimes.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry The 2010 Special 301 Report Is More of the Same, Slightly Less Shrill
by Pranesh Prakash published May 13, 2010 last modified Oct 03, 2011 05:37 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , ,
Pranesh Prakash examines the numerous flaws in the Special 301 from the Indian perspective, to come to the conclusion that the Indian government should openly refuse to acknowledge such a flawed report. He notes that the Consumers International survey, to which CIS contributed the India report, serves as an effective counter to the Special 301 report.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry A Guide to Key IPR Provisions of the Proposed India-European Union Free Trade Agreement
by Glover Wright published Jul 13, 2010 last modified Aug 30, 2011 01:06 PM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , , ,
The Centre for Internet and Society presents a guide for policymakers and other stakeholders to the latest draft of the India-European Union Free Trade Agreement, which likely will be concluded by the end of the year and may hold serious ramifications for Indian businesses and consumers.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry Analysis of the Copyright (Amendment) Bill, 2010
by Pranesh Prakash published Jul 18, 2010 last modified Sep 21, 2011 06:01 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , , , ,
CIS analyses the Copyright (Amendment) Bill, 2010, from a public interest perspective to sift the good from the bad, and importantly to point out what crucial amendments should be considered but have not been so far.
Located in Access to Knowledge / Blogs
Blog Entry Privacy after Big Data: Compilation of Early Research
by Saumyaa Naidu published Nov 12, 2016 last modified Nov 12, 2016 01:37 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , ,
Evolving data science, technologies, techniques, and practices, including big data, are enabling shifts in how the public and private sectors carry out their functions and responsibilities, deliver services, and facilitate innovative production and service models to emerge. In this compilation we have put together a series of articles that we have developed as we explore the impacts – positive and negative – of big data. This is a growing body of research that we are exploring and is relevant to multiple areas of our work including privacy and surveillance. Feedback and comments on the compilation are welcome and appreciated.
Located in Internet Governance / Blog
Blog Entry Between the Stirrup and the Ground: Relocating Digital Activism
by Nishant Shah published Aug 23, 2011 last modified Oct 25, 2015 05:58 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
In this peer reviewed research paper, Nishant Shah and Fieke Jansen draws on a research project that focuses on understanding new technology, mediated identities, and their relationship with processes of change in their immediate and extended environments in emerging information societies in the global south. It suggests that endemic to understanding digital activism is the need to look at the recalibrated relationships between the state and the citizens through the prism of technology and agency. The paper was published in Democracy & Society, a publication of the Center for Democracy and Civil Society, Volume 8, Issue 2, Summer 2011.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Material Cyborgs; Asserted Boundaries: Formulating the Cyborg as a Translator
by Nishant Shah published Nov 07, 2011 last modified Oct 25, 2015 05:57 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
In this peer reviewed article, Nishant Shah explores the possibility of formulating the cyborg as an author or translator who is able to navigate between the different binaries of ‘meat–machine’, ‘digital–physical’, and ‘body–self’, using the abilities and the capabilities learnt in one system in an efficient and effective understanding of the other. The article was published in the European Journal of English Studies, Volume 12, Issue 2, 2008. [1]
Located in RAW