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Blog Entry Reading from a Distance – Data as Text
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Dec 07, 2015 last modified Jun 30, 2016 05:06 AM — filed under: , , , ,
An extended survey of digital initiatives in arts and humanities practices in India was undertaken during the last year. Provocatively called 'mapping digital humanities in India', this enquiry began with the term 'digital humanities' itself, as a 'found' name for which one needs to excavate some meaning, context, and location in India at the present moment. Instead of importing this term to describe practices taking place in this country - especially when the term itself is relatively unstable and undefined even in the Anglo-American context - what I chose to do was to take a few steps back, and outline a few questions/conflicts that the digital practitioners in arts and humanities disciplines are grappling with. The final report of this study will be published serially. This is the third among seven sections.
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Blog Entry Interface Intimacies
by Audrey Yue and Namita A Malhotra published Mar 23, 2012 last modified Oct 24, 2015 01:40 PM — filed under: , , ,
Sherry Turkle, in her book Alone Together, talked about how the digital technologies, replacing interface time with face-time, are slowly alienating us from our social networks. There has been an increasing amount of anxiety around how people in immersive and ubiquitous computing and web environments are living lives which are connected online but not connected with their social and political contexts.
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Blog Entry Digital Humanities Alliance of India - Inagural Conference 2018 - Keynote by Puthiya Purayil Sneha
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Jun 26, 2018 last modified Jun 26, 2018 12:02 PM — filed under: , , , , ,
The inaugural conference of the Digital Humanities Alliance of India (DHAI) was held at the Indian Institute of Management (IIM), Indore on June 1-2, 2018. The event was co-organised by the IIM and the Indian Institute of Technology, Indore, with support from the Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore. Puthiya Purayil Sneha was a keynote speaker at the event. Her talk was titled ‘New Contexts and Sites of Humanities Practice in the Digital’. Drawing upon excerpts from a study on mapping digital humanities initiatives in India, and ongoing conversations on digital cultural archiving practices, the keynote address discussed some pertinent concerns in the field, particularly with respect to the growth of digital corpora and its intersections with teaching learning practices in arts and humanities, including the need to locate these efforts within the context of the emerging digital landscape in India, and its implications for humanities practice, scholarship and pedagogy.
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Blog Entry Pornography & the Law - A Call for Peer Review
by Prasad Krishna published Dec 21, 2010 last modified Dec 14, 2012 12:12 PM — filed under: , ,
Namita Malhotra's research project on "Pornography & the Law". is a part of the Researchers @ Work Programme at the Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore. Her monograph is an attempt to unravel the relations between pornography, technology and the law in the shifting context of the contemporary.
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Blog Entry Digital Transition in Newspapers in India: A Pilot Study
by Zeenab Aneez published Jul 19, 2016 last modified Jul 20, 2016 11:43 AM — filed under: , , , ,
This pilot study situates itself at the intersection of global trends in news and journalism, and emergent practises of legacy print media in India. Our aim is to explore how legacy print newspapers are transitioning to the online space. The study will address questions in two thematic clusters: 1) the work of journalism, and 2) how the emergence of the digital, both as a source of news, and the medium of distribution, is shaping the work of newspaper journalists.
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Porn: Law, Video & Technology
by Namita A Malhotra published Aug 02, 2011 last modified Nov 10, 2011 09:39 AM — filed under:
Namita Malhotra’s monograph on Pornography and Pleasure is possibly the first Indian reflection and review of its kind. It draws aside the purdah that pornography has become – the forbidden object as well as the thing that prevents you from looking at it – and fingers its constituent threads and textures. This monograph is not so much about a cultural product called porn as it is a meditation on visuality and seeing, the construction and experience of gazing, technology and bodies in the law, modern myths, the interactions between human and filmic bodies. And technology not necessarily as objects and devices that make pornography possible (but that too), but as history and evolution, process and method, and what this brings to understanding what pornography is.
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Blog Entry Digital mediation of domestic and care work in India: Project Announcement
by Ambika Tandon and Aayush Rathi published Oct 01, 2019 last modified Oct 10, 2019 08:09 AM — filed under: , , , ,
It is our great pleasure to announce that we are undertaking a study on digital mediation of domestic and care work in India, as part of and supported by the Feminist Internet Research Network led by the Association for Progressive Communications (APC), funded by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC). The study is exploring the ways in which structural inequalities, such as those of gender and class, are being reproduced or challenged by digital platforms. The project sites are Delhi and Bangalore, where we are conducting interviews with workers, companies, and unions. In Bangalore, we are collaborating with Stree Jagruti Samiti to collect qualitative data from different stakeholders. The outputs of the research will include a report, policy brief, and other communication materials in English, Hindi, and Kannada. This study is being led by Ambika Tandon and Aayush Rathi, along with Sumandro Chattapadhyay.
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Blog Entry Doing Standpoint Theory
by Ambika Tandon and Aayush Rathi published Oct 10, 2019 last modified Dec 06, 2019 04:59 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
Feminist research methodology has evolved from different epistemologies, with several different schools of thought. Some of the more popular ones are feminist standpoint theory, feminist empiricism, and feminist relativism. Standpoint theory holds the experiences of the marginalised as the source of ‘truth’ about structures of oppression, which is silenced by traditional objectivist research methods as they produce knowledge from the standpoint of voices in positions of power. In this essay published on the GenderIT website, Ambika Tandon and Aayush Rathi [1] discuss the practical applicability of these epistemologies to research practices in the field of technology and gender.
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Blog Entry Who Owns Your Phone?
by Nishant Shah published Sep 18, 2016 — filed under: , , , ,
The capacity of companies to defy standards that work tells an alarming story of what we lose when we lose control of our devices.
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CPOV : Wikipedia Research Initiative
by Nishant Shah published Mar 16, 2010 last modified Aug 23, 2011 02:52 AM — filed under: , , , , , , ,
The Second event, towards building the Critical Point of View Reader on Wikipedia, brings a range of scholars, practitioners, theorists and activists to critically reflect on the state of Wikipedia in our contemporary Information Societies. Organised in Amsterdam, Netherlands, by the Institute of Network Cultures, in collaboration with the Centre for Internet and Society, Bangalore, the event builds on the debates and discussions initiated at the WikiWars that launched off the knowledge network in Bangalore in January 2010. Follow the Live Tweets at #CPOV
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