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The Mirror in the Enigma: How Germany lost World War II to a Mathematical Theorem

by elonnai hickok — last modified Sep 22, 2011 07:53 AM
Today we use encryption in pretty much everything — cellphones, Internet, banking, satellites, and spaceships. How far have we come since the days of the Enigma and how does it affect our daily lives? CIS invites you to attend a short lecture by Rohit Gupta on August 12, 2011.

Event details

When

Aug 12, 2011
from 11:30 AM to 12:30 PM

Where

The Centre for Internet and Society

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About the Lecture 

During World War II, the Germans began communicating their military information using the famous Enigma encryption machine. Subsequently, we see how three Polish mathematicians led by Marian Rejewski broke the code using a fundamental theorem in 'group theory'. It has been suggested by certain generals that this breach directly led to the collapse of the Axis powers.  

In his talk Rohit will begin with the simplest ways to secure privacy in communication throughout human history, and build up to the rise of the Enigma.

About Rohit

Rohit Gupta is a mathematician who thinks the universe is a giant hologram generated by a microscopic black hole which behaves like a rapidly blinking disco ball. He's finding ways to prove this beyond doubt.

 

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