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Call, text, email complaint against rogue auto driver

by Prasad Krishna last modified Apr 02, 2011 10:45 AM
Harassed by an auto driver? Helplines give you no relief? Here's the people's way to help you out. Just report your issue online, call or even SMS sitting in a noisy restaurant, and be heard.

Right from drivers with no proper identity cards, to those refusing to ply or those who attempt sexual assault enroute, you can report them all to a team of volunteers who manage a complaint book 24x7. There is also a map online, where you can pinpoint the exact place, time and even upload videos or photographs taken on the spot.

This complaint management system, recently launched by Kiirti (part of the Centre for Internet and Society) is an attempt to help tackle the cases of auto menace in the city. "It's quite like the Fix My Street initiative of the West. This is for the people and maintained by the people. What makes it different from the existing helpline mechanism in Bangalore is that there is better transparency and more options given to people on how they can file their complaint 24x7,'' explains Sudha Nair, project community manager for Kiirti in India.

All the complaints received will be scrutinised and verified by a backend support team of volunteers and then sent across to the department concerned for action. Besides, the complainant will be able to check the status of the complaint.

"Recently, in The Times of India, we read about the sad state of the official helplines provided by the transport department. There is no transparency in it nor is it available all the time, so we decided to launch this system. We are only working as a catalyst. The portal can also be effectively used by various RWAs to help check the problem in their area,'' Sudha added. Various NGOs like Janaagraha, Environment Support Group, Public Affairs Centre and Children's Movement for Civic Action have also come forward to support this initiative.

Read the original in the Times of India

 

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