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February 2014 Bulletin
by Prasad Krishna published Feb 28, 2014 last modified Apr 07, 2014 07:27 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
The Centre for Internet and Society (CIS) welcomes you to the second issue of its newsletter (February) for the year 2014:
Located in About Us / Newsletters
Blog Entry Confession in the Digital Age
by Sneha PP published Apr 14, 2014 — filed under:
The pervasive influence of digital technology, particularly the Internet in our lives today seems to have blurred the boundaries between the real and virtual, public and private. The perceived condition of anonymity made available by the digital sphere brings forth questions about identity and the self, and more importantly the conditions that have come together in creating a new notion of the private sphere. In this guest post Rimi Nandy reflects upon her research study on the trend of Facebook confessions in India, and its implications for questions of identity and self-representation.
Located in RAW / Digital Humanities
Blog Entry Animating the Archive – A Survey of Printed Digitized Materials in Bengali and their Use in Higher Education
by Sneha PP published Apr 14, 2014 — filed under:
With the advent of digital technologies and the internet, archival practice has seen much change in its imagination and function, such as to extend its scope beyond preservation to a collaborative, open source model which facilitates new modes of knowledge production. In this blog post, Saidul Haque reflects upon his research project on a survey of digitized materials in Bengali, and some of the impediments to their use in higher education and research.
Located in RAW / Digital Humanities
Blog Entry Binary Code Invades the Universal Problematic
by Anirudh Sridhar published May 26, 2014 last modified May 27, 2014 05:35 AM — filed under:
This essay looks at language as an archive and posits, through a reading of Foucault, Derrida, Saussure and Jakobson that the means of perceiving language in the digital has changed. Communication requires community and the large networks made possible by the binary code, an added layer of linguistic units, changes the way we are able to communicate online. Big Data has further changed the way we interact with language and the world. The way the machine perceives language, through selection rather than combination with access to the “complete” archive allows it to make predictions and decisions through mere correlation rather than the causational mode of science hitherto conducted by human beings.
Located in RAW / Digital Humanities
Blog Entry CIS Featured in 'Building Expertise to Support Digital Scholarship: A Global Perspective' Report
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Oct 16, 2015 last modified Oct 16, 2015 07:43 AM — filed under: , , ,
This report, authored by Vivian Lewis, Lisa Spiro, Xuemao Wang, and Jon E. Cawthorne, sheds light on the expertise required to support a robust and sustainable digital scholarship (DS) program. It focuses first on defining and describing the key domain knowledge, skills, competencies, and mindsets at some of the world’s most prominent digital scholarship programs. It then identifies the main strategies used to build this expertise, both formally and informally. The work is set in a global context, examining leading digital scholarship organizations in China, India, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Germany, Mexico, Canada, and the United States. The report team visited and spoke to us last year, as part of the study. Here are the Executive Summary and link to the final report.
Located in RAW
December 2013 Bulletin
by Prasad Krishna published Dec 31, 2013 last modified Feb 25, 2014 01:51 PM — filed under: , , , , , ,
Our newsletter for the month of December 2013 can be accessed below.
Located in About Us / Newsletters
Blog Entry The Digital Humanities from Father Busa to Edward Snowden
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Sep 04, 2017 last modified Oct 04, 2017 11:02 AM — filed under: , ,
What do Edward Snowden, the whistle-blower behind the NSA surveillance revelations, and Father Roberto Busa, an Italian Jesuit, who worked for almost his entire life on Saint Thomas Aquinas, have in common? The simple answer would be: the computer. Things however are a bit more complex than that, and the reason for choosing these two people to explain what the Digital Humanities are, is that in some sense they represent the origins and the present consequences of a certain way of thinking about computers. This essay by Dr. Domenico Fiormonte, lecturer in the Sociology of Communication and Culture in the Department of Political Sciences at University Roma Tre, was originally published in the Media Development journal.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry Alt needs to Shift
by Nishant Shah published Nov 18, 2012 last modified Dec 14, 2012 10:03 AM — filed under: , ,
People maybe talking more online, but they all seem to be talking about the same kind of thing.
Located in RAW / Digital Humanities
Blog Entry A Question of Digital Humanities
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Nov 16, 2015 last modified Jun 30, 2016 05:06 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
An extended survey of digital initiatives in arts and humanities practices in India was undertaken during the last year. Provocatively called 'mapping digital humanities in India', this enquiry began with the term 'digital humanities' itself, as a 'found' name for which one needs to excavate some meaning, context, and location in India at the present moment. Instead of importing this term to describe practices taking place in this country - especially when the term itself is relatively unstable and undefined even in the Anglo-American context - what I chose to do was to take a few steps back, and outline a few questions/conflicts that the digital practitioners in arts and humanities disciplines are grappling with. The final report of this study will be published serially. This is the second among seven sections.
Located in RAW
Blog Entry The Infrastructure Turn in the Humanities
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Dec 07, 2015 last modified Jun 30, 2016 05:07 AM — filed under: , , , ,
An extended survey of digital initiatives in arts and humanities practices in India was undertaken during the last year. Provocatively called 'mapping digital humanities in India', this enquiry began with the term 'digital humanities' itself, as a 'found' name for which one needs to excavate some meaning, context, and location in India at the present moment. Instead of importing this term to describe practices taking place in this country - especially when the term itself is relatively unstable and undefined even in the Anglo-American context - what I chose to do was to take a few steps back, and outline a few questions/conflicts that the digital practitioners in arts and humanities disciplines are grappling with. The final report of this study will be published serially. This is the fourth among seven sections.
Located in RAW