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Blog Entry New Contexts and Sites of Humanities Practice in the Digital (Paper)
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Jun 25, 2018 last modified Dec 06, 2019 05:03 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
The ubiquitous presence of the ‘digital’ over the couple of decades has brought with it several important changes in interdisciplinary forms of research and knowledge production. Particularly in the arts and humanities, the role of digital technologies and internet has always been a rather contentious one, with more debate spurred now due to the growth of fields like humanities computing, digital humanities (henceforth DH) and cultural analytics. Even as these fields signal several shifts in scholarship, pedagogy and practice, portending a futuristic imagination of the role of technology in academia and practice on the one hand, they also reflect continuing challenges related to the digital divide, and more specifically politics around the growth and sustenance of the humanities disciplines. A specific criticism within more recent debates around the origin story of DH in fact, has been its Anglo-American framing, drawing upon a history in humanities computing and textual studies, and located within a larger neoliberal imagination of the university and academia. While this has been met with resistance from across different spaces, thus calling for more diversity and representation in the discourse, it is also reflective of the need to trace and contextualize more local forms of practice and pedagogy in the digital as efforts to address these global concerns. This essay by Puthiya Purayil Sneha draws upon excerpts from a study on the field of DH and related practices in India, to outline the diverse contexts of humanities practice with the advent of the digital and explore the developing discourse around DH in the Indian context.
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Blog Entry Data bleeding everywhere: a story of period trackers
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Jun 11, 2019 last modified Dec 06, 2019 05:03 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
This is an excerpt from an essay by Sadaf Khan, written for and published as part of the Bodies of Evidence collection of Deep Dives. The Bodies of Evidence collection, edited by Bishakha Datta and Richa Kaul Padte, is a collaboration between Point of View and the Centre for Internet and Society, undertaken as part of the Big Data for Development Network supported by International Development Research Centre, Canada.
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Blog Entry Unpacking video-based surveillance in New Delhi
by Aayush Rathi and Ambika Tandon published Jun 20, 2019 last modified Jun 20, 2019 05:13 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
Aayush Rathi and Ambika Tandon presented at an international workshop on 'Urban Data, Inequality and Justice in the Global South', on 14 June 2019, at the University of Manchester. The agenda for the workshop and the slides from the presentation by Aayush and Ambika are available below.
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Blog Entry Making Humanities in the Digital: Embodiment and Framing in Bichitra and Indiancine.ma
by Puthiya Purayil Sneha published Mar 31, 2018 last modified Jun 25, 2018 12:50 PM — filed under: , , , ,
The growth of the internet and digital technologies in the last couple of decades, and the emergence of new ‘digital objects’ of enquiry has led to a rethinking of research methods across disciplines as well as innovative modes of creative practice. This chapter authored by Puthiya Purayil Sneha (published in 'Making Things and Drawing Boundaries: Experiments in the Digital Humanities' edited by Jentery Sayers) discusses some of the questions that arise around the processes by which digital objects are ‘made’ and made available for arts and humanities research and practice, by drawing on recent work in text and film archival initiatives in India.
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Blog Entry Digital Activism in Asia Reader
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Aug 08, 2015 last modified Oct 24, 2015 02:36 PM — filed under: , , , , , ,
The digital turn might as well be marked as an Asian turn. From flash-mobs in Taiwan to feminist mobilisations in India, from hybrid media strategies of Syrian activists to cultural protests in Thailand, we see the emergence of political acts that transform the citizen from being a beneficiary of change to becoming an agent of change. In co-shaping these changes, what the digital shall be used for, and what its consequences will be, are both up for speculation and negotiation. Digital Activism in Asia marks a particular shift where these questions are no longer being refracted through the ICT4D logic, or the West’s attempts to save Asia from itself, but shaped by multiplicity, unevenness, and urgencies of digital sites and users in Asia. It is our great pleasure to present the Digital Activism in Asia Reader.
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Blog Entry Civil Society Organisations and Internet Governance in Asia - Open Review
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Aug 19, 2015 last modified Nov 13, 2015 05:54 AM — filed under: , , , ,
This is a book section written for the third volume (2000-2010) of the Asia Internet History series edited by Prof. Kilnam Chon. The pre-publication text of the section is being shared here to invite suggestions for addition and modification. Please share your comments via email sent to raw[at]cis-india[dot]org with 'Civil Society Organisations and Internet Governance in Asia - Comments' as the subject line. This text is published under Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.
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Blog Entry Civil Society Organisations and Internet Governance in India - Open Review
by Sumandro Chattapadhyay published Aug 19, 2015 last modified Nov 13, 2015 05:51 AM — filed under: , , , ,
This is a book section written for the third volume (2000-2010) of the Asia Internet History series edited by Prof. Kilnam Chon. The pre-publication text of the section is being shared here to invite suggestions for addition and modification. Please share your comments via email sent to raw[at]cis-india[dot]org with 'Civil Society Organisations and Internet Governance in India - Comments' as the subject line. This text is published under Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license.
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Blog Entry COVID-19 Charter Of Recommendations on Gig Work
by Aayush Rathi and Ambika Tandon published Apr 30, 2020 last modified May 13, 2020 08:53 AM — filed under: , , , , , , , , ,
Tandem Research and the Centre for Internet and Society organised a webinar on 9 April 2020, with unions representing gig workers and researchers studying labour rights and gig work, to uncover the experiences of gig workers during the lockdown. Based on the discussion, the participants of the webinar have drafted a set of recommendations for government agencies and platform companies to safeguard workers’ well being. Here are excerpts from this charter of recommendation shared with multiple central and state government agencies and platforms companies.
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Blog Entry Simiran Lalvani - Workers’ Fictive Kinship Relations in Mumbai App-based Food Delivery
by Simiran Lalvani published Dec 04, 2019 last modified May 19, 2020 06:25 AM — filed under: , , , , ,
Working in the gig-economy has been associated with economic vulnerabilities. However, there are also moral and affective vulnerabilities as workers find their worth measured everyday by their performance of—and at—work and in every interaction and movement. This essay by Simiran Lalvani is the first among a series of writings by researchers associated with the 'Mapping Digital Labour in India' project at the CIS, supported by the Azim Premji University, that were published on the Platypus blog of the Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Computing (CASTAC). The essay is edited by Noopur Raval, who co-led the project concerned.
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Blog Entry Zothan Mawii - COVID-19 and Relief Measures for Gig Workers in India
by Zothan Mawii (Tandem Research) published Apr 14, 2020 last modified May 19, 2020 05:41 AM — filed under: , , , , , ,
CIS is cohosted a webinar with Tandem Research on the impact of the COVID-19 response on the gig economy on 9 April 2020. It was a closed door discussion between representatives of workers' unions, labour activists, and researchers working on gig economy and workers' rights to highlight the demands of workers' groups in the transport, food delivery and care work sectors. We saw this as an urgent intervention in light of the disruption to the gig economy caused by the nationwide lockdown to limit proliferation of COVID-19. This is a summary of the discussions that took place in the webinar authored by Zothan Mawii, a Research Fellow at Tandem Research.
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